Hyde Park – What to do and what to see?

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This is the biggest of the Royal Parks, covering 340 acres. Once part of a farmhouse left to the monastery at Westminster soon following the Norman Invasion, deer, wild bulls and boar roamed freely. Henry VIII gained ownership following the 16th century Dissolution of the Monasteries and he used it for hunting. It was only opened to the civic in the early 17th century. It became heavily fashionable and then in the 19th century it was the site of the Great Exhibition housed in the Crystal Palace.

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Today it’s catchy with Londoners and visitors to the assets alike. On fine days, you will see people who work nearby sitting in the park eating their lunches. On very hot days, some of them will be lying down hoping to get a sun tan in their lunchtime. There will be people playing with a ball or Frisbee, others on foot their dogs and some sitting quietly reading.

The Serpentine – the man-made lake anyplace you can hire a boat and try your hand at rowing

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Kensington Gardens, particularly the Princess Diana Memorial Walk, on the west side of the park

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Statue of Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens

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Rotten Row anyplace people ride their horses

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Pet Cemetery at Victoria Gate on Bayswater

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The Queen Elizabeth Gates on the south-eastern end abutting Park Lane. They were erected in honor of the Queen Mother.

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Speakers Corner, on the north east area by Marble Arch, is famed for its orators standing on soapboxes on Sundays declaiming their views to the world.

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